Blog Posts by Ann Linnea

An Inside View of Seattle’s Kayak Protest

The scene at West Seattle’s Alki Beach was chaotic in a friendly sort of way. Hundreds of kayakers were moving their multi-colored boats across the cobble shore for launching. Someone yelled out, “Everyone please gather over here.” A young woman explained the flow of the morning. “We will follow the Native canoes into the water. A Salish long boat will come by to let us know it’s time to launch.” For me, the announcement that ...
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Hawkeye and the Peregrine Falcon

Our two-week camping excursion in the desert southwest with our 10-year-old grandson, Jaden, was extraordinary. He brought a freshness of perspective, an eagerness of spirit, and keenness of eyes and ears. One chilly morning in the middle of our trip, he woke us out of a sound tent sleep at 6:30 a.m. “Maga, Nina, listen!” he said. We sat up in the predawn light so our not-so-young ears could perceive what had caught his attention ...
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Preparing is Part of the Fun

This spring break we are taking our 10-year-old grandson on his first ever camping, road trip. On a recent trip to Los Angeles, where Jaden lives, we spent a Sunday afternoon shopping at REI to get the kind of gear an LA boy does not normally need—headlamp, hiking boots, long underwear, rain gear. It was a family outing: Dad took care of the four-year-old, ended up sitting on the camp chair demos having a pretend ...
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You Never Know

All of my outdoor life I have “been prepared”—carried my ten essentials, and then some. Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ten_Essentials has an excellent article on the importance of bringing extra gear to handle the inevitable surprises that wilderness travel presents to the backcountry wayfarer. On a recent ski trip my years of traveling with the “ten essentials plus” saved one woman’s ski trip. Friends and I were staying in a backcountry hut—a 12 kilometer ski from the trailhead, ...
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We love our Tree

We live in a bioregion that grows conifer trees—lots and lots of them. Christmas tree farms are a big business here—a kind of agricultural product. So, it feels completely natural to make the acquisition of our annual Christmas tree an outing to a tree farm. Our local tree farm has been in the same family for three generations—a casual kind of operation that allows you to take a saw and chose your own. There has ...
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Leaving a Legacy

On November 11, 2014 I honored the first anniversary of my father’s death by spending most of the day outdoors either hiking or gardening—great loves he passed on to me. He was a man who left his wife, 4 daughters, grandchildren, and great grandchildren a strong legacy of determination, loyalty, hard work, and tradition. In October Christina and I spent 3 weeks traveling and teaching in Europe to celebrate the release of The Circle Way ...
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Home to the Garden

I have just arrived home from a 10,000+ mile journey to carry our circle work further into Europe. We were royally hosted by our Belgium, German, and Austrian friends as we worked together to offer numerous workshops and gatherings that ultimately were attended by circle carriers from 14 European countries. It was an extraordinary journey. I will write more about it later. Today I am simply happy to be home on this lovely piece of ...
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A Forest Talking

Forests have a lot to say, if we listen, look, and shift our focus from human concerns to nature concerns. Recently friends and I were walking a remote trail in the valley of the Hamma Hamma River in the Olympic Mountains in Washington State. Even though it was late August and a sunny 75 degrees F., it was rain forest lush—mosses, ferns, and Devils Club near all the seeps. The canopy around us was an ...
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Deep Water Passage

“Grandma, I skipped the stone!” exclaimed our 9-year-old grandson, Jaden. He and I had been practicing in the calmer backwaters of the Gooseberry River and he was ready to try his hand at skipping flat, wave-worn rocks into the wind and waves of the world’s largest lake. Three-year-old granddaughter, Sasha, was having her own fun throwing fistfuls of pebbles into the waves. In the August sunshine, that Lake Superior combination of warm air and cold ...
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Working Bicycles of the Netherlands

We are visiting the Netherlands and learning a lot about this small, densely populated country. One of the most obvious sites (besides the windmills) in both urban and rural areas is bicycles. The Dutch have the most bicycles per head of population in the world. (1.3 per citizen old enough to ride) Many Dutch own more than one—one for everyday use and a “best” one for cycle trips. According to Wikipedia, 27% of all ...
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